We aren’t exactly shy about the fact that we adore juiced-up estate cars here at Flat-Out. Everything about a powerful, elongated family wagon quietly oozes style and sophistication (unlike their bruiser SUV counterparts), while subtly beating sports cars to a pulp on a daily basis.

Dutch collective of automotive wizards Vandenbrink Design (they are not actual wizards) have released their latest creation in the form of the Vandenbrink Shooting Brake – a 2+2 grand tourer based not the monstrously powerful Ferrari 612… and we just melted.

Image by: Vandenbrink Design

The ‘shooting brake’ styling is typically described as a stretched wagon with two doors and a dash sports-car panache. Its lengthy silhouette is traditionally linked to fox hunting and British country estates, but we couldn’t help thinking it would attract all sorts of attention at the local surf break. And probably not for the right reasons.

With each model being designed for the clients specific purpose, there is no stock list of specs or pricing”

Frankly, it doesn’t matter what you want to do with this thing, because it packs a 5.7-litre V12 developing 533bhp, yet boasts enough trunk for even the most lavish car boot sale.

Image by: Vandenbrink Design

It took almost eight years to complete, with the initial sketches jotted down on paper back in 2008, but now Vandenbrink Design is ready to unleash its creation on the world, with a press release that claims the vehicle ‘retains sex appeal with the practicality of a wagon’. Old school.

“It packs a 5.7-litre V12 developing 533bhp, yet boasts enough trunk for even the most lavish car boot sale”

With each model being designed for the clients specific purpose, there is no stock list of specs or pricing, and we’re not exactly sure how the addition of that bulging back end has affected the original car’s 0-60mph sprint time of 4.2 seconds. We do know that the lengthy rear is going to create a whole host of blind spot issues. Motorcyclists, you have been warned.

Fine out more about the Ferrari-based shooting brake over at the Vandenbrink Design site.